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  • Rikke Højer Nielsen has used the ancient Japanese art of gyotaku - fish print - in her research and work with school children. Photo: Rikke Højer Nielsen
    Rikke Højer Nielsen has used the ancient Japanese art of gyotaku - fish print - in her research and work with school children. Photo: Rikke Højer Nielsen

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Umami-synergy and the overcoming of disgust: Taste for Life celebrates two new PhD's

Article :

Taste for Life is proud to present two new PhD's from the University of Copenhagen:

Rikke Højer has defended her PhD thesis ”Is there fish in the fish cakes?’ – An interdisciplinary inquiry into the influence of a sensory-based experiential theme course on fish on children’s food literacy and fish-eating behavior” supervised by associate professor Michael Bom Frøst (University of Copenhagen) and professor Karen Wistoft (Aarhus University).

Charlotte Vinter Schmidt has defended her PhD thesis ”Gastrophysical and chemical characterisation of umami, taste pairing, and texture in relation to sustainable food” supervised by associate professor Karsten Olsen and professor Ole G. Mouritsen (both University of Copenhagen).

Mentioned in the article

PhD, postdoc.

Charlotte Vinther Schmidt works at the Dept. of Food Science at the University of Copenhagen. In Taste for Life she has been involved in several projects, such as a project on Danish squid, optimizing product development using chemical and physical analysis of texture and umami-specific components, and sensory evaluation.

She also works to empower Danish children, young people and adults to make food choices based on evidence.

Senior lecturer, chef, PhD

Rikke Højer Nielsen was part of Taste for Life's Science of Cooking focus area 2014 - 2018. She has been conducting a PhD-study on children’s taste learning, specifically how to overcome barriers for eating fish.